Zalman ZM-M600R

m600r

Today we’re looking at the Zalman ZM-M600R gaming mouse. Zalman is a company best known for their aftermarket cooling solutions for desktop PCs, but they also have offerings for storage, audio, and in this case, gaming peripherals. The M600R is a surprisingly decent little mouse with just a few quarks.

I’ll be completely honest, I expected to be disappointed with the M600R strictly because it is a more budget mouse than I’m used to. I am happy to report that, while some corners were cut to keep costs down, it appears that they were cut in (mostly) the right places.

The M600R does not feel exceptionally sturdy, but it’s not flimsy either, which is about what you would expect of a mouse with such an appealing price tag. Zalman opted to use a sensor with adjustable DPI from 600 up to 4,000 which is more than enough for the average gamer, and it performed well in testing sans the obnoxiously high lift distance.

It does have a few quarks. These things don’t impact performance at all, but were odd design choices that should be mentioned. The first weird thing I noticed about the M600R, before I even plugged it in, is that the bottom of the mouse houses two switches – one for DPI and one for Polling Rate. Yes, on the bottom of the mouse – you have to flip it over to access them – meaning they’re completely useless mid game. The M600R does have a button above the scroll wheel where you would expect a DPI toggle to reside, but it isn’t a DPI toggle. Instead, it is a back button for your browser.

The default lighting scheme is frankly horrendous. It features one lighting zone that “breathes” between different colors and one that stays the same based on what DPI you have selected. This results in an almost always clashing color scheme. To make matters worse, the provided software that I presume should allow me to change this default behavior (and hopefully map the not-a-DPI button to a DPI button) doesn’t recognize the mouse is even plugged in at all, so I’m stuck with ugly lighting.

Like I said at the beginning, the M600R does have its quarks – but I can’t argue that the performance is there, and for a reasonably low price. If you’re tight on cash, don’t mind a few weird design choices, or need a gaming mouse in a pinch, Zalman’s budget option might be worth checking out, otherwise you may be better off looking at some more premium models.

Manufacturer: Zalman
Model: ZM-M600R
Price at time of review:  $25

Review unit provided by the manufacturer.

Today we're looking at the Zalman ZM-M600R gaming mouse. Zalman is a company best known for their aftermarket cooling solutions for desktop PCs, but they also have offerings for storage, audio, and in this case, gaming peripherals. The M600R is a surprisingly decent little mouse with just a few quarks. I'll be completely honest, I expected to be disappointed with the M600R strictly because it is a more budget mouse than I'm used to. I am happy to report that, while some corners were cut to keep costs down, it appears that they were cut in (mostly) the right places. The M600R does not feel exceptionally sturdy, but it's not flimsy either, which is about what you would expect of a mouse with such an appealing price tag. Zalman opted to use a sensor with adjustable DPI from 600 up to 4,000 which is more than enough for the average gamer, and it performed well in testing sans the obnoxiously high lift distance. It does have a few quarks. These things don't impact performance at all, but were odd design choices that should be mentioned. The first weird thing I noticed about the M600R, before I even plugged it in, is that the bottom of the mouse houses two switches - one for DPI and one for Polling Rate. Yes, on the bottom of the mouse - you have to flip it over to access them - meaning they're completely useless mid game. The M600R does have a button above the scroll wheel where you would expect a DPI toggle to reside, but it isn't a DPI toggle. Instead, it is a back button for your browser. The default lighting scheme is frankly horrendous. It features one lighting zone that "breathes" between different colors and one that stays the same based on what DPI you have selected. This results in an almost always clashing color scheme. To make matters worse, the provided software that I presume should allow me to change this default behavior (and hopefully map the not-a-DPI button to a DPI button) doesn't recognize the mouse is even plugged in at all, so I'm stuck with ugly lighting. Like I said at the beginning, the M600R does have its quarks - but I can't argue that the performance is there, and for a reasonably low price. If you're tight on cash, don't mind a few weird design choices, or need a gaming mouse in a pinch, Zalman's budget option might be worth checking out, otherwise you may be better off looking at some more premium models. Manufacturer: Zalman Model: ZM-M600R Price at time of review:  $25 Review unit provided by the manufacturer. [taq_review]

ZM-M600R

Build Quality - 6
Features - 6.5

6.3

If you're tight on cash, don't mind a few weird design choices, or need a gaming mouse in a pinch, Zalman's budget option might be worth checking out.

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Author: Ben

Ben is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of PCGR. He writes much of the content, manages the site, and does other editorial things that would bore you to tears.