Steel Series Siberia v3

siberiav3

We recently had the chance to review the Siberia v3 Prism by Steel Series, and overall we were really impressed. Today we are looking at the Prism’s kid brother, the Siberia v3. Aside from the obvious lack of LEDs, the Siberia v3 does have a few noteworthy differences from the Prism.

The Siberia v3 features the same basic form factor of other Siberia headsets however like the Prism, we see several build quality upgrades over previous generations. The most notable upgrade is that the ear cups are now made of noise isolating memory foam, meaning they’re really comfortable, and keep all the right sounds in all the right places. Of course, we still have the signature retractable mic and headband suspension, but the cabling used for the suspension is stronger than before. If you haven’t ever worn a Siberia headset, you will want to know they are supremely comfortable, even for extended sessions.

As with the Prism, I have some concerns about some of the changes made to this generation of Siberia headsets – it is still a fantastic headset mind you, but there are a few areas worth noting. First of all, like the Prism, we are missing inline volume control – a feature we were used to from previous generations of Siberia cans. I really hope we see inline volume control in future models. I was happy to see that the Siberia v3 included a cable extension option, but was surprised to find out that it was essentially required to use the extension to get full mic capability (at least on PC). Rather than having the default connection be dual 3.5mm, the default is a single 3.5mm connector with a longer dual 3.5mm adapter. After a bit of use, the reasoning behind the single 3.5mm jack approach became a bit more clear. With this change, Steel Series opened the door to use the Siberia v3 with mobile devices. While this means PC users are forced into using the longer cable, it also means the headset is more versatile – and versatility is a good thing.

In our testing, the standard Siberia v3 actually outperformed the Prism, if just by a hair. We have the same 50mm drivers, but managed to get 15Hz lows and 21kHz highs out of them. The bass quality is superb – no rattling or shaking even in the extreme lows. The driver matching was nearly perfect, and volume was consistent across all frequencies.

The Siberia v3 is a fantastic headset from a line of fantastic headsets. If RGB lighting is your thing and you don’t need a mobile friendly headset, check out the Siberia v3 Prism for a slight premium, otherwise pick yourself up a Siberia v3. You won’t regret it.

Manufacturer: SteelSeries
Model: Siberia v3
Price at time of review: $89

Review unit provided by the manufacturer.

We recently had the chance to review the Siberia v3 Prism by Steel Series, and overall we were really impressed. Today we are looking at the Prism's kid brother, the Siberia v3. Aside from the obvious lack of LEDs, the Siberia v3 does have a few noteworthy differences from the Prism. The Siberia v3 features the same basic form factor of other Siberia headsets however like the Prism, we see several build quality upgrades over previous generations. The most notable upgrade is that the ear cups are now made of noise isolating memory foam, meaning they're really comfortable, and keep all the right sounds in all the right places. Of course, we still have the signature retractable mic and headband suspension, but the cabling used for the suspension is stronger than before. If you haven't ever worn a Siberia headset, you will want to know they are supremely comfortable, even for extended sessions. As with the Prism, I have some concerns about some of the changes made to this generation of Siberia headsets - it is still a fantastic headset mind you, but there are a few areas worth noting. First of all, like the Prism, we are missing inline volume control - a feature we were used to from previous generations of Siberia cans. I really hope we see inline volume control in future models. I was happy to see that the Siberia v3 included a cable extension option, but was surprised to find out that it was essentially required to use the extension to get full mic capability (at least on PC). Rather than having the default connection be dual 3.5mm, the default is a single 3.5mm connector with a longer dual 3.5mm adapter. After a bit of use, the reasoning behind the single 3.5mm jack approach became a bit more clear. With this change, Steel Series opened the door to use the Siberia v3 with mobile devices. While this means PC users are forced into using the longer cable, it also means the headset is more versatile - and versatility is a good thing. In our testing, the standard Siberia v3 actually outperformed the Prism, if just by a hair. We have the same 50mm drivers, but managed to get 15Hz lows and 21kHz highs out of them. The bass quality is superb - no rattling or shaking even in the extreme lows. The driver matching was nearly perfect, and volume was consistent across all frequencies. The Siberia v3 is a fantastic headset from a line of fantastic headsets. If RGB lighting is your thing and you don't need a mobile friendly headset, check out the Siberia v3 Prism for a slight premium, otherwise pick yourself up a Siberia v3. You won't regret it. Manufacturer: SteelSeries Model: Siberia v3 Price at time of review: $89 Review unit provided by the manufacturer. [taq_review]

Siberia v3

Build Quality - 9.5
Sound Quality - 9.5
Features - 8

9

The Siberia v3 is a fantastic headset from a line of fantastic headsets.

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Author: Ben

Ben is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of PCGR. He writes much of the content, manages the site, and does other editorial things that would bore you to tears.