Feenix Aria

aria3

Feenix is a small company that markets high end gaming peripherals, with a focus on quality over quantity. Today we are looking at possibly the highest quality headset that we have seen thus far – the Aria. There is quite a lot I love about this headset, but it is not perfect by any means.

First things first, this headset is marketed as an “audiophile” headset, and boy does it deliver. Its 50mm drivers boast some impressive stats. It has a frequency range of 10Hz-26kHz, which is well outside anything we have seen in any gaming headset we have reviewed, on both the high and low end. Pair that with the 64 ohm impedance and 101dB sensitivity and you start to understand why the cable box says “Audiophile” on it. It is a tad bass heavy, but even at max volume there was no noticeable rattle in the drivers. For those of you that don’t know the tech side of audio – the sound quality is fantastic, and is easily the best thing about this headset.

With a sturdy frame and Japanese pine wood ear cups, the Aria has a build quality that should stand the test of time. The foam ear cups are completely noise cancelling (maxed out, my wife couldn’t hear a single thing standing right in front of me), which is a huge plus in my book. Something little I appreciated was the braille R and L on the inside of the headband that just says “Feenix is classy” that much more.

While I absolutely LOVED experiencing such high quality audio, I was pretty disappointed with some of Feenix’s design decisions. Feenix markets specifically to gamers, and what we have in the Aria is frankly, not a gaming headset. We have an Audiophile headset with, perhaps, a slight nod to gaming. Let me elaborate.

The headset, combined with the thick cable, is noticeably heavier than most gaming headsets out there. The included mic is pretty high quality, but seems like an afterthought, as it is not attached to the headset in any way. Rather than a boom or in-line mic, we have a separate clip on mic with an obnoxiously long cable. While setting up the Aria I found myself juggling an unnecessary amount of cable and trying to find ways to manage it so as not to roll over it with my chair. It would have been nice for Feenix to include something that catered specifically to gamers – variable cable lengths, a carrying case, on-cup or in-line mic, mute button, and volume control, anything to justify spending over $200 on a headset to use for gaming.

It pains me not to give a better score to such a great quality product. However, Feenix had a goal to introduce gamers to audiophile level sound quality. They delivered on audio quality, but they didn’t include a single feature that would draw in the average gamer. I’ve been gaming for years. I can tell you sound quality is important, but for gaming, I would take functionality over sound quality any day. I feel like Feenix missed the mark here. I’m not trying to be overly critical, and please hear me when I say I REALLY love this headset – I simply wouldn’t game in it.

Manufacturer: Feenix
Model: Aria
Price at time of review: $220

Review unit provided by manufacturer.

Feenix is a small company that markets high end gaming peripherals, with a focus on quality over quantity. Today we are looking at possibly the highest quality headset that we have seen thus far - the Aria. There is quite a lot I love about this headset, but it is not perfect by any means. First things first, this headset is marketed as an "audiophile" headset, and boy does it deliver. Its 50mm drivers boast some impressive stats. It has a frequency range of 10Hz-26kHz, which is well outside anything we have seen in any gaming headset we have reviewed, on both the high and low end. Pair that with the 64 ohm impedance and 101dB sensitivity and you start to understand why the cable box says "Audiophile" on it. It is a tad bass heavy, but even at max volume there was no noticeable rattle in the drivers. For those of you that don't know the tech side of audio - the sound quality is fantastic, and is easily the best thing about this headset. With a sturdy frame and Japanese pine wood ear cups, the Aria has a build quality that should stand the test of time. The foam ear cups are completely noise cancelling (maxed out, my wife couldn't hear a single thing standing right in front of me), which is a huge plus in my book. Something little I appreciated was the braille R and L on the inside of the headband that just says "Feenix is classy" that much more. While I absolutely LOVED experiencing such high quality audio, I was pretty disappointed with some of Feenix's design decisions. Feenix markets specifically to gamers, and what we have in the Aria is frankly, not a gaming headset. We have an Audiophile headset with, perhaps, a slight nod to gaming. Let me elaborate. The headset, combined with the thick cable, is noticeably heavier than most gaming headsets out there. The included mic is pretty high quality, but seems like an afterthought, as it is not attached to the headset in any way. Rather than a boom or in-line mic, we have a separate clip on mic with an obnoxiously long cable. While setting up the Aria I found myself juggling an unnecessary amount of cable and trying to find ways to manage it so as not to roll over it with my chair. It would have been nice for Feenix to include something that catered specifically to gamers - variable cable lengths, a carrying case, on-cup or in-line mic, mute button, and volume control, anything to justify spending over $200 on a headset to use for gaming. It pains me not to give a better score to such a great quality product. However, Feenix had a goal to introduce gamers to audiophile level sound quality. They delivered on audio quality, but they didn't include a single feature that would draw in the average gamer. I've been gaming for years. I can tell you sound quality is important, but for gaming,…

Feenix Aria

Build Quality - 8.5
Sound Quality - 10
Features - 1

6.5

It pains me not to give a better score to such a great quality product. I REALLY love this headset - I simply wouldn't game in it.

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Author: Ben

Ben is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of PCGR. He writes much of the content, manages the site, and does other editorial things that would bore you to tears.